Daniel B. Berch

Professor

Phone: 434-924-0763
Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
Location: One Morton Drive 106-7
Curriculum vitae: Berch_CV_-_December_2011
Department: Leadership, Foundations and Policy

Education

  • Ph.D., University of New Mexico, 1969
  • M.A., Michigan State University, 1967
  • B.A., University of Michigan, 1965

Personal Statement

Prior to coming to UVa, Daniel Berch served as Associate Chief of the Child Development and Behavior Branch at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, where he also directed the Program in Mathematics and Science Cognition and Learning. Berch initially came to the Washington, DC area in 1997 as an SRCD/AAAS Executive Branch Science Policy Fellow. He was subsequently appointed Senior Research Associate at the U. S. Department of Education, advising the Assistant Secretary for Educational Research and Improvement on technical and policy matters pertaining to educational research. In his earlier academic career, Berch was Director of Research for the Department of Psychology at the University of Cincinnati, where he also chaired the University’s Institutional Review Board and served as Research Coordinator for the University Affiliated Cincinnati Center for Developmental Disorders. Among other honors, Berch has received the NIH Award of Merit, was elected Fellow of the American Psychological Association’s Division of Experimental Psychology, served as an ex officio member of the U.S. Department of Education’s National Mathematics Advisory Panel, and is a member of the National Center for Learning Disabilities Professional Advisory Board.

Research Interests

Berch’s research interests are in the areas of children’s numerical cognition, mathematical learning disabilities, and cognitive dysfunctions in individuals with Turner syndrome. He has authored various articles and book chapters on these topics, and is senior editor of the book (co-edited with Michele Mazzocco), Why is Math So Hard For Some Children?: The Nature and Origins of Mathematical Learning Difficulties and Disabilities (2007), published by Paul H. Brookes.

Expertise