Curry Students Conduct Student Survey on UVA’s Honor System

Students in Patrick Meyer's Research, Statistics and Evaluation program were asked to conduct a survey. Four students chose to focus their survey on U.Va.'s Honor System.

Read More

Latest News

Curry School Students Launch First-Ever ‘Research Week’

Beginning today, students at the Curry School of Education are hosting a weeks’ worth of events aimed at preparing students to better conduct and present research.

Read More

Prof. Cohen Named to Emerging Education Policy Scholars Program

Julie Cohen, an assistant professor and researcher at EdPolicyWorks, is named to the 2015 EEPS program, which is an elite group of promising Ph.D.s doing education policy work.

Read More

CASTL’s Jeff Kosovich Publishes on Carnegie Commons Blog

CASTL’s Jeff Kosovich Publishes on Carnegie Commons Blog

Read More

CASTL’s Mission to Improve Education in Latin America

CASTL is doing a descriptive study of children’s classroom experiences in Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd grade in Brazil, Chile and Ecuador

Read More

Latest Media

Gingerbreadical Village 2014

Gingerbreadical Village 2014

Students entered the fray (and took home some awards) in Curry’s Fourth Annual Gingerbreadical Village Contest.

Video: Jeff Henig gives Curry Research Lecture on 12/5/14

Video: Jeff Henig gives Curry Research Lecture on 12/5/14

Dr. Jeff Henig from Columbia University completed a talk on entitled “The Politics of Educational Research” on Friday December 5th, 2014 for the Curry Research Lectureship Series.

Talk abstract: How should serious researchers think about the intersection of politics and education policy? The most common formulation is to construe politics as a source of interference and bias. Politics is the process through which research agendas get manipulated to sidestep challenging notions, research designs get twisted to confirm favored hypotheses, and findings get skewed to buck up the status quo. From this perspective, researchers should build as high a wall as possible separating themselves from the dynamics of politics and peer over that wall only cautiously and with both feet on the other side. But politics and policy are inextricably bound and if researchers want their work to contribute to usable knowledge they need at the very least to understand the relationship and there is a chance they need to do more than that. Building on his study of the politics of charter school research, Professor Henig will offer general reflections on the politics of education research as they play out in controversial areas like market-based reform, high stakes testing and teacher assessment.

Prof. Jennings Presents Master Lecture on Mindfulness in the Classroom

Prof. Jennings Presents Master Lecture on Mindfulness in the Classroom

Patricia (Tish) Jennings was invited to present a Master Lecture with my colleague Kimberly Schonert-Reichl, an education professor at the University of British Columbia, at the International Symposium for Contemplative Sciences held in Boston October 30 to November 2 that was sponsored by the Mind and Life Institute, a non-profit organization committed to building a scientific understanding of the mind as a way to help reduce suffering and promote human flourishing.

A Mind and Life Fellow, Jennings was one of the first to receive their Francisco Varela Award in 2004 that supported her program of study that has resulted in the CARE for Teachers professional development program.

Video: Susanna Loeb gives Curry Research Lecture on 11/14/14

Video: Susanna Loeb gives Curry Research Lecture on 11/14/14

Dr. Susanna Loeb from Stanford University completed a talk on entitled “Information, Choice, and Decision-Making: Field Experiments with Adult and Student School Choosers” on Friday November 14th, 2014 for the Curry Research Lectureship Series.

Talk abstract: What families know and believe about the schools available to them can define the behaviors of school choosers and school choice markets. We conducted field experiments with school choosers in Milwaukee, Washington, DC, and Philadelphia. In Milwaukee and DC, randomly selected families received booklets with school information and ratings. We observed that families selecting middle schools in each city tended to enroll their children in higher-rated schools in response to the information treatment, while families selecting high schools in each city tended to enroll their children in lower-rated schools. To examine why these groups responded differently, and to learn more about information’s effects upon more proximate decision-making processes, we conducted an experiment at a Philadelphia high school fair. Randomly selected adult and 7th/8th-grade student attendees received a school information booklet prior to completing a survey. The treatment led adult school choosers to prioritize higher-rated schools, demonstrate increased knowledge of their alternatives, feel more confident in their abilities to choose schools, and prioritize the academic characteristics emphasized in the booklets. The treatment had virtually no effects upon student school choosers. We discuss this adult-student distinction in the context of our observation that students appear deeply involved in choosing their own high schools (after likely being less involved in choosing their own middle schools).

News Updates

Connect With Us On: