Curry School Study: Social Ties, Self-Esteem Vital to Low-Income Black, Latino Boys

Counter to negative stereotypes, low-income, urban teenage males of color endorsed values like achievement and responsibility, and had positive attitudes toward school and beliefs about their future.

Read More

Latest News

Student Profile: Sadie Hasbrouck wants to make a difference

Making a difference directly for those who need it. That is what 3rd year graduate student Sadie Hasbrouck pursues on a daily basis at the Curry School of Education.

Read More

Making Schools Safer: U.Va.’s Curry School Armed with $6.1 Million for Projects

Two grants from the National Institutes of Justice will support the evaluation of two distinct programs aimed at preventing school violence.

Read More

Edith C. Lawrence Receives Curry School’s 2014 Outstanding Professor Award

In recognition of her professional stature, teaching, research and service, Edith C. “Winx” Lawrence has received the 2014 Outstanding Curry Professor Award.

Read More

Curry School Honors Spotsylvania County Career and Technical Center Principal Lee Browning

Lee Browning, principal of the Spotsylvania County Public Schools Career and Technical Center, has been selected to receive the 2014 Outstanding Alumni Principal Award.

Read More

Latest Media

Video: C. Kirabo Jackson gives Education Policy Seminar on 10/6/14

Video: C. Kirabo Jackson gives Education Policy Seminar on 10/6/14

Dr. C. Kirabo Jackson from Human Development and Social Policy at Northwestern University completed a talk on entitled “Non-Cognitive Ability, Test Scores, and Teacher Quality: Evidence from 9th Grade Teachers in North Carolina” on Monday October 6th, 2014 for the Education Policy Seminar Series sponsored by EdPolicyWorks.

Talk Abstract: This paper presents a model where teacher effects on long-run outcomes reflect effects on both cognitive skills (measured by test-scores) and non-cognitive skills (measured by non-test-score outcomes). In administrative data, teachers have causal effects on test-scores and student absences, suspensions, grades, and on-time grade progression. Teacher effects on a weighted average of these non-test score outcomes (a proxy for non-cognitive skills) predict teacher effects on dropout, high-school completion, and college-entrance-exam taking above and beyond their effects on test scores. Accordingly, test-score effects alone fail to identify excellent teachers and may understate the importance of teachers for longer-run outcomes.

Video: Cory Koedel gives Education Policy Seminar on 9/29/14

Video: Cory Koedel gives Education Policy Seminar on 9/29/14

Dr. Cory Koedel from the University of Missouri-Columbia completed a talk on entitled “Pension Enhancements and the Retention of Public Employees: Evidence from Teaching” on Monday September 29th, 2014 for the Education Policy Seminar Series sponsored by EdPolicyWorks.

Talk Abstract: We use data on workers in the largest public-sector occupation in the United States – teaching – to examine the effect of pension enhancements on employee retention. Specifically, we study a 1999 enhancement to the pension formula for public school teachers in St. Louis that discretely and dramatically increased their incentives to remain in covered employment. The St. Louis enhancement is substantively similar to enhancements that occurred in other state and municipal pension plans across the United States in the late 1990s and early 2000s. To identify the effect of the enhancement on teacher retention, we leverage the fact that the strength of the incentive increase varied across the workforce depending on how far teachers were from retirement eligibility when it was enacted. The retention incentives for late-career teachers were increased the most by the enhancement but their behavioral response was modest. A cost-benefit analysis indicates that the pension enhancement was not a cost-effective way to improve employee retention.

 

New Hires Take Soaring Programs to a New Level

New Hires Take Soaring Programs to a New Level

Several of the Curry School programs have long been rated among the best in the nation. Several new appointments just upped the ante.

Undergraduate Researcher Program from Summer 2014

Undergraduate Researcher Program from Summer 2014

The Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP) is an 8-week education research internship hosted by the Curry School of Education at U.Va, with support from interdisciplinary faculty, administrators, students and staff across the university. The program aims to provide undergraduate students from underrepresented groups with valuable educational research and professional development experience to better prepare them for careers in academics, policy, or research organizations. During the 2014 summer, eight interns from across the U.S. worked on research projects, attended workshops and presented at a research conference. Read more about each intern and their research project from our 2014 Question and Answer series: Dr. Hurd, Dr. Williams, Dr. Deutsch, and Dr.s Cottone & Hulleman.

News Updates

Connect With Us On: