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Six Myths of Gifted Education That Lead to Overlooking Talented Minority Students

Three Curry School of Education researchers describe the origins of the gifted gap, and suggest some ways it can be closed.

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More Than 90 Employers Set to Vie for Curry Class of 2016

Curry School of Education students set to graduate this spring can explore employment options from China to Morocco to Alaska, all without leaving Grounds.

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Future Teachers Respond Better to Multimedia Lessons than Text

The latest study is one of a series that shows that students learn specific lessons better from Web-based instruction than from reading the same content in books or articles.

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Only UVA Faculty Win IES Grant Awards in Both PreK and Higher Education

IES recently funded projects in two targeted areas: pre-K and higher education. The Curry School is the only institution with faculty members winning grant awards in both.

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Teacher Turnover Under IMPACT Has Positive Effect on Teacher Quality, Student Achievement

Results from a new study by Curry School and Stanford’s Graduate School of Education researchers shows that teacher turnover under IMPACT, improved student performance.

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Video: Tim Sass gives Ed Policy Seminar on 11/16/15

Video: Tim Sass gives Ed Policy Seminar on 11/16/15

Dr. Tim Sass from Georgia State University completed a talk entitled “Do the Cheated Ever Prosper? The Long-Run Effects of Test-Score Manipulation by Teachers on Student Outcomes” on Monday November 16th, 2015 for the Ed Policy Seminar Series sponsored by EdPolicyWorks.

Talk Abstract: One of the many concerns over high-stakes testing is the incentive for teachers to alter test scores by providing answers to students during a test or correcting the answers of their students after the test is taken.  Indeed a number of cases of test-score manipulation by teachers have been uncovered throughout the country in recent years.  While recent research has developed methods for detecting “cheating” by teachers, little is known about how the falsification of test scores impacts students.  Using a 10-year panel of individual-level data on students and teachers from an urban school district where test scores were manipulated, we investigate the effects of teacher cheating on subsequent student achievement, attendance, behavior and educational attainment.  In math we find that test scores drop below expected levels in the first year post-cheating year, but rebound thereafter.  For reading and ELA, however, we uncover relatively robust negative effects of being cheated on student achievement for at least three years.  The estimated effects are at least as great as having a rookie teacher, rather than a teacher with five or more years of experience.  We also find some evidence that cheated middle-school students may be more likely to drop out of high school.

Video: Peter Youngs gives Curry Research Lecture on 11/6/15

Video: Peter Youngs gives Curry Research Lecture on 11/6/15

Dr. Peter Youngs from the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia completed a talk on entitled “The Role of Social Context In Beginning Teacher Development” on Friday November 6th, 2015 for the Curry Research Lectureship Series.

Talk abstract: Experimental studies, particularly randomized control trials, are often considered the “gold standard” in educational research. In research on teacher development, though, some RCTs that explored promising induction or professional development approaches have produced negligible results. And in the area of pre-service teacher preparation, there are many challenges to even conducting experimental studies at all. In this presentation, Peter Youngs will describe a set of his own completed and ongoing studies of beginning teachers’ commitment, retention, and instructional practices that a) focus on social context and b) represent alternative ways of designing research on novice teachers.

Video: Doug Harris gives Curry Research Lecture on 10/16/15

Video: Doug Harris gives Curry Research Lecture on 10/16/15

Dr. Doug Harris from Tulane University completed a talk on entitled “Taken by Storm: The Effects of the New Orleans School Reforms on Student Outcomes and School Practices” on Friday October 16th, 2015 for the Curry Research Lectureship Series.

Talk abstract: The school reforms put in place in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina represent the most intensive test-based and market-based school accountability system ever created in the United States. Collective bargaining was ended, yielding flexible human capital management. Traditional attendance zones were eliminated, expanding choice for families. And almost all public schools were taken over by the state, which turned over management to outside non-profit charter management organizations working under performance contracts. These structural changes led to the hiring of less experienced and uncertified teachers from alternative preparation programs. Ten years later, this study provides the first examination of the effects of this package of reforms on student achievement. Identification is based on multiple difference-in-difference (DD) strategies, using outcomes before and after the hurricane and reforms in New Orleans and a matched comparison group that experienced hurricane damage but not the school reforms. The estimation procedures address potential threats to identification, including changes in the population, distortions in test scores from high-stakes accountability, the influence of the interim schools attended by evacuated students, and the trauma and disruption from the hurricane itself. With the possible exception of test-based accountability distortions, these factors seem to have a small influence and, collectively, they appear to cancel each other out. The results suggest that, over time, as the reforms yielded a new system of schools, they had large positive cumulative effects of 0.2-0.4 standard deviations.

Undergraduate Researcher Program from Summer 2015

Undergraduate Researcher Program from Summer 2015

The Summer Undergraduate Research Program (SURP) is an 10-week education research internship hosted by the Curry School of Education at U.Va, with support from interdisciplinary faculty, administrators, students and staff across the university. The program aims to provide undergraduate students from underrepresented groups with valuable educational research and professional development experience to better prepare them for careers in academics, policy, or research organizations. During the 2015 summer, eight interns from across the U.S. worked on research projects, attended workshops and presented at a research conference. Read more about each intern and their research project from our 2015 Question and Answer series: Dr.s Tolan & Williams, Dr. Kennedy, Dr. Deutsch, and Futch & Deutsch.

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