Study Identifies Why Re-Educating Torturers May Not Work

Rachel Wahl, an assistant professor in U.Va.’s Curry School of Education, found that human rights educators working in India revealed a fundamental misunderstanding of police and military officers’ moral compasses.

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Student Profile: Micela Leis Wants Every Child to Feel Excited About Going to School

Remember those days as a child, waking up and feeling excited about going to school? Micela Leis does vividly. It’s one of the reasons she became a teacher

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U.VA. MEDIA ALERT: ‘Vocal Hygiene’ Workshop Designed to Educate Oft-Spoken Professionals

On Nov. 19, from 4 to 6:30 p.m., Aliaa Khidr, will present a “Vocal Hygiene” workshop designed for teachers and other voice-users.

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Student Spotlight: Mindy Adnot Tackles Tough Teacher Evaluation Issues

Mindy Adnot, a student researcher at EdPolicyWorks, discuss about her work at Curry on teacher evaluation systems.

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Curry Early Childhood Researchers Sign Consensus Letter to Support Increased Investments

Curry researchers in early childhood are founding signatures in an open letter to increase investments in high-quality early childhood education.

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Video: Susanna Loeb gives Curry Research Lecture on 11/14/14

Video: Susanna Loeb gives Curry Research Lecture on 11/14/14

Dr. Susanna Loeb from Stanford University completed a talk on entitled “Information, Choice, and Decision-Making: Field Experiments with Adult and Student School Choosers” on Friday November 14th, 2014 for the Curry Research Lectureship Series.

Talk abstract: What families know and believe about the schools available to them can define the behaviors of school choosers and school choice markets. We conducted field experiments with school choosers in Milwaukee, Washington, DC, and Philadelphia. In Milwaukee and DC, randomly selected families received booklets with school information and ratings. We observed that families selecting middle schools in each city tended to enroll their children in higher-rated schools in response to the information treatment, while families selecting high schools in each city tended to enroll their children in lower-rated schools. To examine why these groups responded differently, and to learn more about information’s effects upon more proximate decision-making processes, we conducted an experiment at a Philadelphia high school fair. Randomly selected adult and 7th/8th-grade student attendees received a school information booklet prior to completing a survey. The treatment led adult school choosers to prioritize higher-rated schools, demonstrate increased knowledge of their alternatives, feel more confident in their abilities to choose schools, and prioritize the academic characteristics emphasized in the booklets. The treatment had virtually no effects upon student school choosers. We discuss this adult-student distinction in the context of our observation that students appear deeply involved in choosing their own high schools (after likely being less involved in choosing their own middle schools).

Video: Greg Darnieder gives Education Policy Seminar on 11/3/14

Video: Greg Darnieder gives Education Policy Seminar on 11/3/14

Greg Darnieder from the United States Department of Education completed a talk on entitled “When Does Research Tip the Decision Scale at the US Dept. of ED? – a Practitioner’s Journey” on Monday November 3rd, 2014 for the Ed Policy Seminar Series sponsored by EdPolicyWorks.

Talk Abstract:  Greg Darnieder is the Senior Adviser to United States Department of Education Secretary Arne Duncan on the College Access Initiative, and is at the forefront of President Obama’s efforts to expand college opportunity and success for all Americans. Throughout his career in public service, from when he directed youth development at the Cabrini-Green Housing Development in Chicago to his role at USDOE, he has collaborated with researchers seeking to study students’ pathways to and through college. In his talk, Mr. Darnieder will discuss how research can most effectively inform education policy—whether at the local, state, or federal levels. He will also share his experience and guidance for how researchers can cultivate productive relationships with schools, districts, and other education agencies.

Memories of the Ruffner Reopening Celebration

Memories of the Ruffner Reopening Celebration

Under a crystal clear sky of twinkling stars on Friday, October 24, Curry School alumni, friends, faculty, staff, and community partners gathered to celebrate the completed renovation of Ruffner Hall and its significance for the future of the Curry School of Education. Nearly 300 people gathered over the course of the evening to tour the building and reminisce with colleagues, old friends, and former professors.

“The work of Curry’s faculty has affected every state, and countries around the globe,” said President Teresa Sullivan in her remarks at the 5 p.m. reception. “Its faculty has helped the University to be ranked among the top three institutions in faculty influence on education policy.  Its graduates are scholars and practitioners who are leaders in their respective professions.”

“For me, the reopening of Ruffner marks the beginning of a new era in the school’s history,” noted Dean Bob Pianta in his remarks, “one in which our focus is truly where it needs to be – on being the most innovative and influential school in the country – an education school that truly matters for the public good.  The completions of these building and renovation projects mean we are now One Curry – all of our programs, faculty, and staff together in one place.”

Video: Catherine Bradshaw gives Curry Research Lecture on 10/10/14

Video: Catherine Bradshaw gives Curry Research Lecture on 10/10/14

Catherine Bradshaw, Ph.D from the University of Virginia completed a talk on entitled ” A Partnership-Based Approach to Scaling-up Evidence-based Programs to Prevent Behavior Problems in Schools” on Friday October 10th, 2014 for the Curry Research Lectureship Series.

Talk abstract: This project focuses on a state-wide effort to scale up an evidence-based model called Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) across the state of Maryland. This decade-long partnership has provided training to over 900 schools with the goal of reducing behavior and mental health problems, improving school climate, and optimizing academic outcomes for students in grades K-12. A more recent effort has been launched to address issues related to equity and the over-representation of students of color in discipline and special education data. A series of partnership-based research projects has been launched by the Maryland State Department of Education, Sheppard Pratt Health System, and researchers at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Virginia, which have leveraged federal funding from NIMH, US Department of Education, IES, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute of Justice, SAMHSA, etc. to conduct rigorous research on PBIS and to integrate other evidence-based models within the tiered prevention framework. This session will focus largely on the formation of the PBIS Maryland Partnership and recent efforts to provide training related to cultural proficiency.

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