EdPolicyWorks Researchers Author over 30 Key Presentations at APPAM

Researchers from EdPolicyWorks are presenting at the annual meetings of the Association for Public Policy Analysis & Management in Albuquerque, NM next week.

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Curry School Study: Social Ties, Self-Esteem Vital to Low-Income Black, Latino Boys

Counter to negative stereotypes, low-income, urban teenage males of color endorsed values like achievement and responsibility, and had positive attitudes toward school and beliefs about their future.

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Student Profile: Sadie Hasbrouck wants to make a difference

Making a difference directly for those who need it. That is what 3rd year graduate student Sadie Hasbrouck pursues on a daily basis at the Curry School of Education.

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Making Schools Safer: U.Va.’s Curry School Armed with $6.1 Million for Projects

Two grants from the National Institutes of Justice will support the evaluation of two distinct programs aimed at preventing school violence.

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Edith C. Lawrence Receives Curry School’s 2014 Outstanding Professor Award

In recognition of her professional stature, teaching, research and service, Edith C. “Winx” Lawrence has received the 2014 Outstanding Curry Professor Award.

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Memories of the Ruffner Reopening Celebration

Memories of the Ruffner Reopening Celebration

Under a crystal clear sky of twinkling stars on Friday, October 24, Curry School alumni, friends, faculty, staff, and community partners gathered to celebrate the completed renovation of Ruffner Hall and its significance for the future of the Curry School of Education. Nearly 300 people gathered over the course of the evening to tour the building and reminisce with colleagues, old friends, and former professors.

“The work of Curry’s faculty has affected every state, and countries around the globe,” said President Teresa Sullivan in her remarks at the 5 p.m. reception. “Its faculty has helped the University to be ranked among the top three institutions in faculty influence on education policy.  Its graduates are scholars and practitioners who are leaders in their respective professions.”

“For me, the reopening of Ruffner marks the beginning of a new era in the school’s history,” noted Dean Bob Pianta in his remarks, “one in which our focus is truly where it needs to be – on being the most innovative and influential school in the country – an education school that truly matters for the public good.  The completions of these building and renovation projects mean we are now One Curry – all of our programs, faculty, and staff together in one place.”

Video: Catherine Bradshaw gives Curry Research Lecture on 10/10/14

Video: Catherine Bradshaw gives Curry Research Lecture on 10/10/14

Catherine Bradshaw, Ph.D from the University of Virginia completed a talk on entitled ” A Partnership-Based Approach to Scaling-up Evidence-based Programs to Prevent Behavior Problems in Schools” on Friday October 10th, 2014 for the Curry Research Lectureship Series.

Talk abstract: This project focuses on a state-wide effort to scale up an evidence-based model called Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) across the state of Maryland. This decade-long partnership has provided training to over 900 schools with the goal of reducing behavior and mental health problems, improving school climate, and optimizing academic outcomes for students in grades K-12. A more recent effort has been launched to address issues related to equity and the over-representation of students of color in discipline and special education data. A series of partnership-based research projects has been launched by the Maryland State Department of Education, Sheppard Pratt Health System, and researchers at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Virginia, which have leveraged federal funding from NIMH, US Department of Education, IES, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute of Justice, SAMHSA, etc. to conduct rigorous research on PBIS and to integrate other evidence-based models within the tiered prevention framework. This session will focus largely on the formation of the PBIS Maryland Partnership and recent efforts to provide training related to cultural proficiency.

Video: C. Kirabo Jackson gives Education Policy Seminar on 10/6/14

Video: C. Kirabo Jackson gives Education Policy Seminar on 10/6/14

Dr. C. Kirabo Jackson from Human Development and Social Policy at Northwestern University completed a talk on entitled “Non-Cognitive Ability, Test Scores, and Teacher Quality: Evidence from 9th Grade Teachers in North Carolina” on Monday October 6th, 2014 for the Education Policy Seminar Series sponsored by EdPolicyWorks.

Talk Abstract: This paper presents a model where teacher effects on long-run outcomes reflect effects on both cognitive skills (measured by test-scores) and non-cognitive skills (measured by non-test-score outcomes). In administrative data, teachers have causal effects on test-scores and student absences, suspensions, grades, and on-time grade progression. Teacher effects on a weighted average of these non-test score outcomes (a proxy for non-cognitive skills) predict teacher effects on dropout, high-school completion, and college-entrance-exam taking above and beyond their effects on test scores. Accordingly, test-score effects alone fail to identify excellent teachers and may understate the importance of teachers for longer-run outcomes.

Video: Cory Koedel gives Education Policy Seminar on 9/29/14

Video: Cory Koedel gives Education Policy Seminar on 9/29/14

Dr. Cory Koedel from the University of Missouri-Columbia completed a talk on entitled “Pension Enhancements and the Retention of Public Employees: Evidence from Teaching” on Monday September 29th, 2014 for the Education Policy Seminar Series sponsored by EdPolicyWorks.

Talk Abstract: We use data on workers in the largest public-sector occupation in the United States – teaching – to examine the effect of pension enhancements on employee retention. Specifically, we study a 1999 enhancement to the pension formula for public school teachers in St. Louis that discretely and dramatically increased their incentives to remain in covered employment. The St. Louis enhancement is substantively similar to enhancements that occurred in other state and municipal pension plans across the United States in the late 1990s and early 2000s. To identify the effect of the enhancement on teacher retention, we leverage the fact that the strength of the incentive increase varied across the workforce depending on how far teachers were from retirement eligibility when it was enacted. The retention incentives for late-career teachers were increased the most by the enhancement but their behavioral response was modest. A cost-benefit analysis indicates that the pension enhancement was not a cost-effective way to improve employee retention.

 

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