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Class of 2016: Curry School Graduates Inaugural Class of Newest Major

Six students make up the inaugural graduating class of Youth and Social Innovation (YSI) majors from the University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education.

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Reducing Teachers’ Stress Leads to Higher Quality Classrooms

Teachers who regularly use stress-reducing strategies increase their abilities to cope with the demands of the career and are positioned to be more effective teachers.

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Class of 2016: Refugees, Language and Identity

From Syrians living in Lebanon to Iraqis living in Central, Virginia, Fares Karam is discovering how learning English plays a role in refugees' education.

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Class of 2016: Creating Autism-Friendly Theater Experiences For Children

During her time at the Curry School, Ana Mendleson founded the Autism Theatre Project, an organization making live theater assessable for children with sensory sensitivity.

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Ed Policy Ph.D Alumna Reflects on Her Time at Curry and in the MPP Dual Degree Program

Eva Galdo discusses her current work and reflects on her time in the VEST Program.

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Latest Media

Video: Jason Grissom gives Ed Policy Seminar on 4/25/16

Video: Jason Grissom gives Ed Policy Seminar on 4/25/16

Dr. Jason Grissom from Vanderbilt University completed a talk entitled “Principal Licensure Exams and Future Job Performance: Evidence from the School Leaders Licensure Assessment” on Monday April 25th, 2016 for the Ed Policy Seminar Series sponsored by EdPolicyWorks.

Talk Abstract: Many states require prospective principals to pass a licensure exam as a condition of obtaining an administrative license. Little is known, however, about the potential effects of principal licensure exams on the pool of available principals or whether exams are predictive of later job performance. We investigate the most commonly used exam, the School Leaders Licensure Assessment (SLLA), using ten years of data on test takers in Tennessee. Our analysis uncovers two main results. First, there are substantial differences in passage rates by test-taker race and gender. In particular, nonwhites with otherwise similar characteristics are 12 percentage points less likely than whites to attain the required minimum score for licensure. Second, although applicants with higher scores are more likely to be hired as principals, we find little evidence that SLLA scores predict potential measures of principal job performance, including supervisors’ ratings from the statewide evaluation system or low-stakes leadership ratings from a statewide teacher survey. Our results raise questions about whether conditioning administrative licensure on SLLA passage is consistent with the goal of a diverse principal workforce.

Ridley 2016 - The Stubborn Roots of Educational Inequality: Race, Class, and Organizational Culture

Ridley 2016 - The Stubborn Roots of Educational Inequality: Race, Class, and Organizational Culture

The Stubborn Roots of Educational Inequality: Race, Class, and Organizational Culture in U.S. Schools.
by Prudence Carter, Ph.D.
Jacks Family Professor of Education
Stanford University

Tuesday, April 12
4:00p.m.
Holloway Hall Room 116 in Bavaro Hall
Reception following in Bavaro Atrium

Prudence L. Carter is the Jacks Family Professor of Education, Professor of Sociology (by courtesy), and Faculty Director of the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities at Stanford University. Carter’s research and teaching expertise are in the areas of inequality and the sociology of education, with a particular focus on race, ethnicity, class, gender, culture, and identity. She is the author of the award-winning book Keepin’ It Real: School Success Beyond Black and White (2005) and of Stubborn Roots: Race, Culture, and Inequality in U.S. and South African Schools (2012). She co-edited Closing the Opportunity Gap:  What America Must Do to Give Every Child an Even Chance and has authored numerous journal articles, book chapters, and essays. Carter holds a Ph.D. and an M.Phil. in sociology from Columbia University, an M.A. in sociology and education from Teachers College, Columbia University, and a B.S. in applied mathematics and economics from Brown University. In June 2016, Carter will become Dean of the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley.

Video: Elise Cappella gives CRC Keynote & Curry Research Lecture on 2/26/16

Video: Elise Cappella gives CRC Keynote & Curry Research Lecture on 2/26/16

Dr. Elise Cappella from NYU completed a talk on entitled “Natural Opportunities for Academic Learning and Mental Health in Urban Schools: Evidence from Intervention Trials” on Friday February 26th, 2016 for the CRC Keynote and the Curry Research Lectureship Series.

Talk abstract: In schools, too often mental health goals are not well aligned with academic learning goals. This paper describes two innovative models designed to strengthen contexts of academic learning and mental health for students with and without behavioral difficulties. Links to Learning and BRIDGE were developed via community-university-school partnerships and delivered by existing school mental health professionals in urban elementary schools. Intent-to-treat analysis within two randomized trials revealed short-term effects on observed teaching practices and student academic and psychosocial outcomes. Secondary analysis focused on classroom peer contexts demonstrated the need to better understand and target peer social networks and academic norms. Efforts to extend these models to include peer contexts as intervention targets and embed these approaches into broader education and mental health systems will be discussed.

UVA African Music and Dance Ensemble

UVA African Music and Dance Ensemble

The Curry School of Education hosted the UVA African Music and Dance Ensemble at a Cups & Conversations in February 2016. The African Music & Dance Ensemble explores traditional music and dance forms from West Africa (Ghana, Togo). The ensemble led an interactive performance where many of our students, staff, and faculty participated. This event was sponsored by the Curry Dean’s Office, and organized jointly by the Curry Staff Advisory Council (CSAC), the Diversity Action Committee (DAC), and Ed Council.

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