News Updates

Graduate Student Banse Receives Curry Foundation Award

04/30/2014

Each year the Curry School Foundation announces the student Scholarships, Fellowships, & Awards. This year, a graduate student at the Center for Advanced Study of Teaching and Learning (CASTL) and a fellow in the Virginia Education Science Training (VEST) pre-doctoral program has received the Mary Catherine Ellwein Award.

Holland BanseHolland Banse is a first year Ph.D graduate student in the Applied Developmental Science program studying best instructional practices for math classrooms with high concentrations of ELL students. Banse is interested in math learning for minority populations during the early childhood and elementary school years, particularly for language minority students.

“I am very honored to have received the Mary Catherine Ellwein award, and grateful to the benefactors,” said Banse. “Part of the award’s focus is on social justice research which aligns well with my interests.”

“It’s professionally motivating to receive this award, and I hope to use this as a springboard to extend the research opportunities I’ve already been afforded in my first year at the Curry School and in the VEST Program,” concluded Banse, who is being mentored by Sara Rimm-Kaufman and Natalia Palacios.

This award was established by family and friends in memory of Dr. Mary Catherine Ellwein, a loved and respected member of the Curry School of Education faculty. Students who have a love of learning, a willingness to take intellectual risks, and a concern for issues of social equity are eligible to win this award.

The Virginia Education Sciences Training (VEST) pre-doctoral fellowship program, funded by the U.S. Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences, is an interdisciplinary program has been supporting Ph.D students across education, economics, sociology, and psychology departments at U.Va. The VEST program applies rigorous research methods and analytical techniques in the social sciences field to study school and classroom effects.