Skip to main content

Transitioning from Jail to Community

The current project had three primary goals. We sought to evaluate the success of two
interventions offered to jail inmates at the Albemarle Charlottesville Regional Jail (ACRJ),
provide descriptive information regarding local jail inmates, and gain information regarding post-
release adjustment of jail inmates. Accordingly, we gathered information regarding inmates who
participated in an 8-week sequence of classes offered during jail (NHNB: New Horizons or New
Beginnings)*; a group who received brief transitional consultation from an Offender Aid and
Restoration counselor during the jail stay (OAR), and a group who did not receive either
intervention.


In all, 37 individuals from the original group of 170 (21.8%) were re-booked into ACRJ
within 6 months of release. This included 9 (14.5%) individuals from the NHNB program, 10
individual (20.0%) from the OAR group, and 18 (31.0%) of the controls. Being in either of the
two intervention groups was associated with lower re-booking in comparison to the control group
(χ2 (df = 1, N = 170) = 4.43, p = .03). Follow-up analyses indicated that differences were most
apparent between the NHNB and controls (χ2 (df = 1, N = 120) = 4.69, p = .03). Although
proportionately fewer OAR participants in comparison to controls re-entered within six months,
the difference did not reach statistical significance. The small numbers involved, and resulting
loss of statistical power to detect differences, may account for this non-significant finding.

 

These results imply the benefits of intervention during the jail stay. The magnitude of
rebooking was consistent with the “dosage” of the intervention. The most intensive intervention
was associated with the lowest levels of rebooking (NHNB); the brief intervention (OAR) was
associated with somewhat higher re-booking, but still below level observed in no-intervention
group.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*The eight-week sequence was titled “New Horizons” for female offenders and “New Beginnings” for male
offenders.”

Associated Faculty

Connect With Us On: